Halfords tool sets for carrying out Z3 overhaul

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fish
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Halfords tool sets for carrying out Z3 overhaul

Post by fish » Sat 07 Dec, 2013 19:25

Hi,
Just getting christmas out the way before giving my ageing 2002 a good overhaul in terms of bushes etc…..wishbones et al…

Has anyone had experience in tool sets from Halfords as they are on 1/2 price offer with a lifetime gurantee too….

There is a 90 pice set….

http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/stor ... yId_255215

There is a 170 piece set

http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/stor ... yId_255215

Was wondering to just buy the 90 piece and then spot by "any gaps" as needed, or just take the plunge on the full 170 piece etc….not a lot in it…there is also a 120 & 150 set in between these 2 as well…..just wondering if someone had any of these sets and whether they covered all eventualities….they only equate to an hours labour at the stealership !

Ian
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Tufarlian
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Re: Halfords tool sets for carrying out Z3 overhaul

Post by Tufarlian » Sat 07 Dec, 2013 19:42

Sounds like they are both good deals.

I've had a Halfords set for a good few years now, bought when they were doing a half price deal too.
They have been absolutely fine and good to use. No edges and strong too.

Showed them to my brother who runs a garage and has toolboxes full of Snap On tools and the Halfords stuff stood up pretty well in comparison.

Can't believe I'm praising Halfrauds, but their professional toolkits are good quality and at half price their tools have to be real value.

Mark

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pingu
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Re: Halfords tool sets for carrying out Z3 overhaul

Post by pingu » Sat 07 Dec, 2013 20:48

I've just bought a 120 piece for £80. There are some gaps. There are not enough 1/2" sockets, so tight nuts can't be undone as 3/8" tools would yield. There are gaps in the ring spanners.

The larger sets make up the numbers with little bits and not the important missing tools.

It may be a better idea to get a set of 1/4" sockets, a set of 3/8" sockets, a set of 1/2" sockets, a set of combination spanners, a set of ratchet ring spanners (flexible head), a set of screwdrivers, sets of bits (incl hexagon, internal Torx and external Torx). Make up the missing tools as you need them.

I use bi-hex sockets and buy single hex when required. Bi-hex gives the maximum flexiblilty on knucle bars, but you need "feel" to avoid damaging nuts. If you are ham-fisted, it may be better to go the other way as single hex don't knacker nuts as easily.

Socket sizes I've used recently...

1/4" (small bits are 1/4" hex, so a 1/4" combination spanner allows access in tight confines)
4mm (small nuts on circuit boards)
5.5mm (Jubilee clips)
6mm (Jubilee clips)
7mm (Jubilee clips)
8mm
10mm
11mm
12mm
13mm
14mm
15mm
16mm
17mm
18mm
19mm
24mm
27mm
32mm

Not all have been on the Z, but it gives you an idea of the gaps.

HTH
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mwpe
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Re: Halfords tool sets for carrying out Z3 overhaul

Post by mwpe » Sat 07 Dec, 2013 21:14

These comprehensive sets are all very good but do they have all the obscure fastener tools which BMW and others use now such as torx bits etc. you end up with a lot of tools you never use and short of some essentials.

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Re: Halfords tool sets for carrying out Z3 overhaul

Post by Pierrick » Sat 07 Dec, 2013 21:17

I have a few halfords Tools and they are doing well! Good quality! But I don't know about the life time quaranty.

I usually buy good Tools so I'm sure they will last for ever and I'm not afraid to use a hammer or a steel bar on tight nuts.
The brand I would advise you to buy is FACOM. a true life time guaranty and very good quality Tools.

As you can see here... everthing you need:
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/FACOM-DECEMBE ... 258640adb5

I also have this:
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/FACOM-TOOLS-1 ... 540134f573

Expensive but unbreakable and Very handy!

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Re: Halfords tool sets for carrying out Z3 overhaul

Post by fish » Sun 08 Dec, 2013 10:30

Ok, some good points coming in...this is why I posted this as I was aware of buying too much of the wrong type of tool and being short changed somewhere else....am not doing the engine or anything too special, only wish bones, that kind of thing...

So I assume I can ignore any sets with AF sockets then as it will all be metric right?
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Re: Halfords tool sets for carrying out Z3 overhaul

Post by pingu » Sun 08 Dec, 2013 11:00

fish wrote: So I assume I can ignore any sets with AF sockets then as it will all be metric right?
Correct.

You will only need the occasional A/F. I get a better bite on brake pipe unions with A/F. A 1/2" A/F socket is useful as it is 12.7mm and can be hammered onto a knackered 13mm.

Suspension tools are best based on 1/2" socket set with a knuckle bar.

Engine (other than high torque nuts) is best based on 3/8" and 1/4" socket sets as they are smaller and allow better access.
Pingu

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Re: Halfords tool sets for carrying out Z3 overhaul

Post by fish » Sun 08 Dec, 2013 12:00

pingu wrote:
fish wrote: So I assume I can ignore any sets with AF sockets then as it will all be metric right?
Suspension tools are best based on 1/2" socket set with a knuckle bar.
Ok...I think I will just go for a 1/2" set for now then and spot buy any thing I am short of....they are on half price too...I am in no rush to do the fix as car is SORN until the weather picks up and is nicely garaged..so if I hit any delays, I have plenty of time to resolve any issues etc....
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Re: Halfords tool sets for carrying out Z3 overhaul

Post by Del » Sun 08 Dec, 2013 13:04

My son has the large Halfords set. We have had problems with a couple of internal torx bits which didn't seem fantastic quality - the others seemed fine. Halfords changed with no problems and with production of the receipt. You don't get a lengthy "breaker bar" with the set. As Pingu says, when you're working on big old nuts/bolts under the car - a breaker bar is essential. I couldn't remove my diff and gearbox filler plugs without one :D I also cracked a cheaper socket removing the bottom 18mm bolt on a rear shock absorber :D

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Re: Halfords tool sets for carrying out Z3 overhaul

Post by Gazza » Sun 08 Dec, 2013 13:30

Anyone with any old AF spanners and sockets kicking about doing nothing, let me know :wink:
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XVar
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Re: Halfords tool sets for carrying out Z3 overhaul

Post by XVar » Sun 08 Dec, 2013 15:16

I've had a Halfords socket set (one of the larger ones, neither of the ones linked above though) for a few years now, and I've not found it to be lacking generally. The only extras I've had to buy have been large sockets and spanners for things such as the 22mm centre ball joint nut and the 32mm inner tie rods.

I bought this torx screwdriver set to take care of the various torx screws used in the interior trim, and any time I've needed a larger torx bit, it's included in the halfords socket set (T50 etc.).

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Draper-53515-11 ... aper+53515
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Re: Halfords tool sets for carrying out Z3 overhaul

Post by Robert T » Sun 08 Dec, 2013 15:44

Sorry, Gazza, my AF sets are all shiny and new (and being used)!

Cheers R.

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Re: Halfords tool sets for carrying out Z3 overhaul

Post by Mowerman » Mon 09 Dec, 2013 08:49

Just thought I`d comment on the Halfrauds Professional Tools, I`ve had a number of them during the years and generally found them to be of good quality. The one issue I had was dealt with promptly with a replacement. DON`T buy the sets, it may work out a bit cheaper but as otheres have stated you end up with bits you will never use! Good points are things like the replacement pawls (ratchets bits) you can buy to rebuild the ratchets if they wear out and the good range of sockets available.

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Re: Halfords tool sets for carrying out Z3 overhaul

Post by Robert T » Mon 09 Dec, 2013 10:24

For most of us, I think the advantage of the sets is a box to keep everything in - that way you shouldn't lose any bits and everything is to hand when you're doing a job. Halfords Professional range is pretty good kit - I have two sets of combination spanners (one metric, one AF) out of this range and am very pleased with them - I bought their small professional socket set and later a larger cheaper socket set with AF sockets in it - there is a very noticeable difference in the quality of the larger ratchet handle - this would appear to apply to the other stuff as well, so I'd steer clear of anything but their professional stuff.

Cheers R.
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Re: Halfords tool sets for carrying out Z3 overhaul

Post by Boysie » Mon 09 Dec, 2013 12:59

Robert T wrote:For most of us, I think the advantage of the sets is a box to keep everything in - that way you shouldn't lose any bits and everything is to hand when you're doing a job. Halfords Professional range is pretty good kit - I have two sets of combination spanners (one metric, one AF) out of this range and am very pleased with them - I bought their small professional socket set and later a larger cheaper socket set with AF sockets in it - there is a very noticeable difference in the quality of the larger ratchet handle - this would appear to apply to the other stuff as well, so I'd steer clear of anything but their professional stuff.

Cheers R.
As previously stated, a lot of mechanic are tool tarts and use Snap on, but have often said Halfords pro are as good
I believe they also have a lifetime guarantee as well, as long as you have the receipt I assume
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Re: Halfords tool sets for carrying out Z3 overhaul

Post by woodsta888 » Mon 09 Dec, 2013 13:11

I bought a set of these last year. Changing the sparkplugs I noticed the ratchet was faulty. Finished the job and took the ratchet into Halfords under lifetime warranty. I was told any tools with moving parts are not covered by the lifetime warranty. Fortunately mine was still within 28 days of purchase so they said they'd change it. I asked for my money back as it's the moving parts that will break.
I'd steer clear as that stuff was never wortyh the full RRP anyway. Those tools are half price on and off throughout the year. Lots of good tool manufacturers already mentioned. To add Teng, Wiha, Wera

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Re: Halfords tool sets for carrying out Z3 overhaul

Post by XVar » Tue 10 Dec, 2013 08:32

Mowerman wrote:DON`T buy the sets, it may work out a bit cheaper but as otheres have stated you end up with bits you will never use!
A bit cheaper? Not in my experience - I had to replace a 3/8" drive ratchet that I lost, the identical one individually was £22 - the whole 120+ piece set was only £90 originally!
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Re: Halfords tool sets for carrying out Z3 overhaul

Post by Southernboy » Tue 10 Dec, 2013 11:09

SPANNERS / TIPS AND ADVISORIES.

Sets vs individual pieces....Sets are always cheaper than individual pieces. Regarding the tools required though, the greatest number of bolts nuts etc are sizes:- 10 & 13. A few are odd sizes like 14, 17 and rarely 19 & 22, and a few are smaller - 6's and 8's.
More unusual are the larger sizes which are generally found under the car on suspension parts and inside the engine proper. Torx drives are much the same with the majority of applications requiring 3 or 4 sizes.
A decent set of open flat / ring combo spanners and a set of sockets with a 1/2" or 3/8 drive will cover 99% of maintenance requirements. Screwdrivers of flat, phillips and torx type drives are a must as well as at least 1 very short and one extra long variation of both flat and Phillips.
A useful tool is the "ratchet ring spanner"...these aren't very strong, but are extremely useful when working in tight areas. The idea being to first "unlock" the nut / bolt with a standard flat spanner or socket, and then to use the ratchet to speed up removal especially where the forward / return stroke of a tool is shortened by the space restriction.
A simple and very useful tip is to magnetise all screwdrivers. I'm sure we've all had the experience of trying to get a screw into an awkward confined space and the screw falls out or drops behind something else etc etc. A simple way to magnetise a tool is to use a powerful magnet as usually found on an audio speaker and to "stroke" the screwdriver across it (in one direction only and lengthwise along the shaft of the screwdriver). This allows the screw to be placed on the end of the screwdriver and then moved to position and driven without the need for a second hand holding the screw and often getting in the way.
Small socket spanners can be magnetised in the same way as well as flat spanners....it helps to keep the nut attached to the spanner vs having it fall into an inaccessible area etc. A further tip is the use of "PressStik". Useful for stuffing inside socket spanners to hold a heavy nut inside the socket whilst fitting or removing from a position where it would fall if it weren't held by the presstik.
The value of the cellphone camera when dismantling cannot be over-emphasised. It speeds up repair procedures simply by taking as many photo's as you require to record positions of stuff like electrical wiring, where there are multiple wires of differing colours. A few good close-ups before disconnecting will provide a good record to follow when re-connecting etc. This can also apply to other scenarios where the fitting order of various components is important and / or their relative positions etc.
Another aid is to place / store nuts, bolts, washers etc for a particular component together in one container and labeling accordingly.
Many bolts are as little as 3mm longer / shorter than the next but of the same thread size, in many cases a shorter bolt will be re-fitted into the incorrect hole to find later that a "left-over" longer bolt is too long for the "left-over" hole...and since you cannot be sure which hole you fitted the shorter bolt into by mistake, it can result in a waste of time especially if one has to remove half a dozen bolts to find the error.
Another really useful item to have is a box full of "surgical" latex gloves. Firstly they keep your hands protected from oils and dirt, but they also provide good grip. Just make sure they fit snugly so you don't lose any "feel". This is important when working "blind". There are often places that feel is important especially when trying to remove a nut / bolt etc requires bodily contortions if you want to see what you're doing vs feeling and having a more comfortable posture.
One of my pet hates is working under the dash with the seats still fitted...there just isn't enough space to comfortably lay on my back on the floor. Task dependent, I frequently prefer to remove the seat, toss a couple of thick old towels over the floor and the job is a pleasure vs having my back cut by the hard doorway entrance structure etc. This is especially pertinent when working in the driver side footwell with pedals and steering column adding to the restrictions and also when dealing with center console items below the headunit area on the driver side.
Having the soft top lowered is possibly one of the greatest plusses to working on the interior of the car since it really allows for easier access in general and adds to the available light in which to work.
Under-car work is best conducted whilst lying on a "crawler"....a relatively cheap tool which makes moving about under the car a breeze as well as getting under and out from under the car a pleasure. A 12 volt light on a lead is useful too and if it has a magnetic base on a flexible "goose neck" that is the ideal...it can be magnetically stuck to the bodyworrk, and the neck bent to direct light where required and powered from the car battery, or a spare car battery on a small push trolley. This allows the light and power source to be placed and moved around the vehicle without effort.
Perhaps the most fundamental aspect of any maitenance task is to clean and "restore" every component to as near as dammit to new. Since you're dismantling a component, it is a great opportunity to do a 100% restoration on that area and the surrounds. Cleaning away muck, rust, and generally restoring the area and parts to an "as new" condition means that any future attention in the same area will be so much easier and cleaner to do. Also, it preserves the repaired components which are being re-used and extends their useful life.
As an example, I removed my entire dash, and for those that have done this too, you will know of the "large" pipe / brace which transverses the car under the dash. Apart from a layer of dust over everything under the dash, there is the fine film of rust which forms on this uncoated pipe. I have coated mine with Hammerite now, which firstly prevents further rust, but also prevents the rust dust from infiltrating electronics and electrics under the dash. Another thing I found under the dash was the little "tails" of electrical wire insulation material which had come undone over time. After rewinding the insulation around the affected areas / wires, I used very small / thin cable ties to now permanently keep the insulation from unravelling. Using "fresh" insulation tape might seem to make more sense, but in my experience, the commonly available plastic insulation tape is great for a short while, but it too loses it's integrity and becomes gooey / sticky and a mess too soon. Cable ties are neat, permanent, and easy to remove if required. A can of electrical contact cleaner is quick and effective when re-fitting electrical wiring - again, the opportunity is there to do a 100% restoration, so don't waste it just to save 20 minutes worktime overall. Wiping / dusting all electrical wiring is a must...Nothing worse than trying to distinguish the colour codes of a wires which are so grimy they all look the same colour! Some turps on a soft cloth and gentle wiping will clean them up as good as new. An old toothbrush will also help.
Whatever else you do, don't wear any clothing with any studs or other hard bits which might scratch, hook or otherwise impede your movement and damage the car in any way. Belt buckles are a no-no when leaning into the engine bay, washing the car body, or doing anything where it may catch onto or otherwise damage your car. Comfort whilst working should be a first consideration. It will encourage vs discourage you to go the extra yards to do a thorough job which you will be proud and satisfied with when complete.
Finally, you can never have enough rags / cloths etc to wipe, clean and cushion while you work.

I hope some of the other members will add to my advice above with their personal "aids" which make DIY easier. It all adds up to a general knowledge which will induce confidence in the less experienced to tackle some maintenance on their own.
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Re: Halfords tool sets for carrying out Z3 overhaul

Post by Jet » Fri 13 Dec, 2013 17:02

This set mixes 12sided sockets with 6 to reduce costs, In a like for like situation always go for 6 as they are thicker and an almost perfect fit on the head, less likely to slip and round edges. 12 has more wiggle room and good for light work but more risk of rounding, for jobs like bush replacement choose 6 sided sets.

This is a good example, is better value as it has more useable bits, iincludes 3 softgrip quick release ratchets and some ratchet spanners and cheaper.

http://www.diy.com/nav/fix/handtools/sp ... Id=1173844

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Re: Halfords tool sets for carrying out Z3 overhaul

Post by gookah » Fri 13 Dec, 2013 17:20

Boysie wrote:
I believe they also have a lifetime guarantee as well, as long as you have the receipt I assume

I have a 'bag for life' and it's just ripped, I don't know whether to feel cheated,.........or worried
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Re: Halfords tool sets for carrying out Z3 overhaul

Post by abh29 » Fri 13 Dec, 2013 19:09

I only ever broke 1 tool in my life------that was Snap On torz removing rear screen from a Range Rover . (it was only 4 years old ,had from new)
In fairness Snap On replaced it without an discussion.
It indicated to me dearest is not the best, but I do not use Halfords ,think you needs to take view on a reasonable quality,it really hurts if you get it wrong.
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Re: Halfords tool sets for carrying out Z3 overhaul

Post by Southernboy » Sat 14 Dec, 2013 08:19

A good rule of thumb is to always buy the best quality + guarantee / waranty one can afford. Cheap is OK, but there's nothing worse than being halfway through a job and a required tool breaks or ceases to be useful for whatever reason. Obviously the errant tool only becomes apparent at the moment you use it....so it is integral to your being able to proceed with the task at hand... and that means you're not going any further until you have a replacement tool... I have always bought Gedore tools which are pricey, but I've had them for over 30 years, through several complete re-builds of Jaguar Mk II's / MGB's / BMW's / Mercs and Audi's. I have never had a tool failure. I have a set of 1/2" drive and a set of 1/4" drive sockets. Flats / rings and ratchet rings. They all have their strengths and key is to use the right tool for the application. As mentioned above 6 sided socket is best for "heavy" work and where the integrity of the nut or bolt head must be preserved in as near pristine condition for future work. Never ever use a pliers on a bolt or nut that you are not going to replace. Always use washers where they are specified. Never tighten any nut or bolt beyond the specified torque. Always clean nuts and bolts thoroughly with a fine brass or steel bristle brush. And lastly, aluminium nuts or bolts cannot be used together... ie. one can use an aluminium bolt or nut in conjunction with steel, but not aluminium with aluminium... they will lock up and possibly before you even get to the point where they actually have any fixing effect. Not even oiling or greasing will avoid this aberration.
It goes without saying..."a clean tool is a pleasure to use".... :wink:
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Re: Halfords tool sets for carrying out Z3 overhaul

Post by fast_dps » Mon 16 Dec, 2013 21:34

I would agree with the comments about buying the best quality you can. My tool boxes have been accumulated over the best part of 30 years and have a mixture of different makes. A lot of quality tools can be picked up a a reasonable price at autojumbles and car boot sales. Where possible, especially if it is tight, I will try and use a single hex socket for better drive. There are a few get out of jail tricks as well, a 12 point socket can adequately drive certain larger torx nuts. ( I first used this when doing a timing belt on a vauxhall cavalier). Also certain AF sizes will interchange with metric with no risk to the nut (provided we are talking quality spanner/socket) and AF can sometimes be picked up very cheaply. The obvious comparisons are 3/4 with 19mm, 7/8 with 22mm and 1 1/4 with 32mm.
However, I am an advocate of right tool for the job, to do things an alternative way you have to be confident that you are not going to damage the fastener and cause yourself further issues. And remember if it is really tight a swift blow with the hammer can often shock an item to allow it to be undone.

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pingu
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Re: Halfords tool sets for carrying out Z3 overhaul

Post by pingu » Tue 17 Dec, 2013 00:53

fast_dps wrote:...There are a few get out of jail tricks as well, a 12 point socket can adequately drive certain larger torx nuts...
Allen keys / hexagon bits can also be used on internal Torx.

and last top tip...

flat blade screwdrivers can be used to open pots of paint :lol: .
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Re: Halfords tool sets for carrying out Z3 overhaul

Post by Boysie » Tue 17 Dec, 2013 10:30

pingu wrote:
fast_dps wrote:...There are a few get out of jail tricks as well, a 12 point socket can adequately drive certain larger torx nuts...
Allen keys / hexagon bits can also be used on internal Torx.

and last top tip...

flat blade screwdrivers can be used to open pots of paint :lol: .
I know this was said in jest,
but I have seen so many accidents whilst working,
people using screwdriver to open tins, in most cases the results are amusing with paint everywhere
or a hole in their hand
This not a heath and safety notice, the comment just bought back memories
Ray

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Del
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Re: Halfords tool sets for carrying out Z3 overhaul

Post by Del » Tue 17 Dec, 2013 10:39

Boysie wrote:people using screwdriver to open tins
I find the trick is to gently twist the screwdriver rather than jerking it downwards :D

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Re: Halfords tool sets for carrying out Z3 overhaul

Post by Southernboy » Tue 17 Dec, 2013 10:51

.......I prefer the downward jerk with a little twist.... :roflmao:
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Rafolian
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Re: Halfords tool sets for carrying out Z3 overhaul

Post by Rafolian » Tue 17 Dec, 2013 12:40

So do I Barry, but what's that got to do with opening paint cans?

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Re: Halfords tool sets for carrying out Z3 overhaul

Post by Southernboy » Tue 17 Dec, 2013 12:59

...dunno...someone suggested a downward jerk wasn't good and that just a slow twist was the answer... :wink:
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